67th Medsoc President, Wong Wen Kai

 “I decided to run for Medsoc presidency because after serving one year as an Honorary General Secretary, I wanted to make sure that whatever we were doing the year before was seen through.” “There were many obstacles, but I think the most discouraging one was when people would be unhappy regardless of what you do or don’t do. It can be a horrible feeling when you try to do your best; you sacrifice hours on it, and your own friends don’t know about it. Many people think that oh, if you’re part of Medsoc, it means you get a lot of benefits and advantages, hence we voted for you and you’ll need to serve us. But I think the truth of it is that, I’d like to see everyone in Medsoc, whether they are directors or in directorates, as people who are all volunteers, here to work towards a common goal in contributing to the school and achieving that goal.” “I’d like people to know the human element behind Medsoc, recognize the hard work, time and effort that people have put in to serve the community.”   On how NUS Medicine has changed after being in this school for 5 years:   “Looking back, I think the professors now are much more willing to listen to students’ feedback. They listen to what we have to say and the staff are more willing to change if we say that something is wrong. I feel that the whole school is very driven to improve and change things.”   If you could go back in time, what's one thing you would change about your time spent in Medicine?  “I would study less… in M1 and M2. I probably would’ve done more things in M1 and M2, enjoy myself and get to know more people, especially those in my own batch. Yeah I think I kinda regret studying too hard for M1 and M2, even though I didn’t study very much.”    Fun fact:  Before primary school, Wen Kai used to tap dance and he almost got into Singing in The Rain!

“I decided to run for Medsoc presidency because after serving one year as an Honorary General Secretary, I wanted to make sure that whatever we were doing the year before was seen through.” “There were many obstacles, but I think the most discouraging one was when people would be unhappy regardless of what you do or don’t do. It can be a horrible feeling when you try to do your best; you sacrifice hours on it, and your own friends don’t know about it. Many people think that oh, if you’re part of Medsoc, it means you get a lot of benefits and advantages, hence we voted for you and you’ll need to serve us. But I think the truth of it is that, I’d like to see everyone in Medsoc, whether they are directors or in directorates, as people who are all volunteers, here to work towards a common goal in contributing to the school and achieving that goal.” “I’d like people to know the human element behind Medsoc, recognize the hard work, time and effort that people have put in to serve the community.”

On how NUS Medicine has changed after being in this school for 5 years:
“Looking back, I think the professors now are much more willing to listen to students’ feedback. They listen to what we have to say and the staff are more willing to change if we say that something is wrong. I feel that the whole school is very driven to improve and change things.”

If you could go back in time, what's one thing you would change about your time spent in Medicine?
“I would study less… in M1 and M2. I probably would’ve done more things in M1 and M2, enjoy myself and get to know more people, especially those in my own batch. Yeah I think I kinda regret studying too hard for M1 and M2, even though I didn’t study very much.” 

Fun fact: Before primary school, Wen Kai used to tap dance and he almost got into Singing in The Rain!